The case of Mrs. Bentley, an 82 years old with advanced Alzhiemer…

Question Answered step-by-step The case of Mrs. Bentley, an 82 years old with advanced Alzhiemer… The case of Mrs. Bentley, an 82 years old with advanced Alzhiemer disease who had become unable to feed herself. The issues came to a head of becasue family memebers disagreed with the health care institutions decision to continue nourishing Mrs. Bentley by spoon feeding her. Her eyes are closed much of teh time. She has not spoken since 2010. She does not indicate through her behaviour that she recognize her family or any person an no longer feed herself.  When she open her mouth to accept nourishment or liquid, she swallows it. If she keeps her mouth closed despite a couple attempts, the care attendant makes no attempt to force her to accept nourishment. The question was whether this behaviour on Mrs. Bentley part should be counted as evidence of consent? The Doctor argued that she was not capable,and that her responsiveness when prompted to eat with a spoon was a REFLEX and is not indicative of any concious decision about whether to eat or not.  Her statement of Wishes dated 1991,  Mrs. Bentley wrote that if the time comes when I can no longer take part in decisions for my future  and there is no reasonable expectation of my recovery from extreme physical or mental disability, I direct that I be allowed to die and not be kept a live by ARTIFICIAL means or HEROIC mesaures. Second document, WISHES dated 2005,  If the time comes when I can no longer communicate, , no reasonable prospect of my recovery from severe physcial illness, then I  direct that i allowed to die and not  be kept alive by artifical means such as life support system, tube feeding, antibiotics, resuscitation. Any treatment which has no benifit other than a merer prolongation of my existence should be witheld or withdrawn, even if it means my life is shortened.  QUESTION: There was disagreement about whether Mrs. Bentley was consenting to spoon feeding. Her caregivers believed that by accepting some food and declining others she demontrated she had capacity to make decision about nourishment and was consenting. Do you believe such behaviour could be indicative of consent in persons with late stage Alzheimer or do you believe that consnet simply is not possible in case of late stage of Alzheimer? Research through prcatice guidelines or in textbooks what the general consensus of the expert community is on this question?     Health Science Science Nursing NURSING 247 Share QuestionEmailCopy link Comments (0)